Variable Stars

Algol

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Algol, Beta Persei, is a bright multiple star located in Perseus. It is the second brightest star in the constellation, after Mirfak, Alpha Persei. The star is also known as Gorgona, Gorgonea Prima, Demon Star and El Ghoul. It lies at an approximate distance of 90 light years from Earth and has an apparent magnitude that varies between 2.12 and 3.4.
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XZ Tauri

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hl tauri,variable stars,t tauri variables,taurus constellation

XZ Tauri is a binary star located in Taurus constellation. It lies at an approximate distance of 450 light years from Earth.

XZ Tauri is located in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud, one of the closest star forming regions to Earth. The XZ Tauri system consists of two pre-main sequence stars classified as T Tauri-type variables that orbit each other from a distance of about 6 billion kilometres, or roughly the distance from the Sun to Pluto.

The two components are very young stars. They are located in the north-eastern portion of a dark cloud designated LDN 1551. One of the stars is believed to be a binary itself, which makes XZ Tauri a triple star system.
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Aldebaran

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alpha tauri,hyades,aldebaran star

Aldebaran, Alpha Tauri, also known as the Eye of Taurus, is an orange giant star located at a distance of 65 light years from Earth.

It is the brightest star in Taurus constellation and the 14th brightest star in the night sky. Aldebaran has a luminosity 518 times that of the Sun (153 times in visible light).

The name Aldebaran (pronounced /ælˈdɛbərən/) comes from the Arabic word al-dabarān, meaning “the follower.” The name refers to the Pleiades cluster (Messier 45), which the star appears to be following across the sky.
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Spica

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spica,alpha virginis,brightest star in virgo,virgo cluster

Spica, Alpha Virginis, is the brightest star in the southern constellation Virgo and the 16th brightest star in the sky.

It is a blue subgiant star located at a distance of 262 light years from Earth. Spica is really a close binary star system. It is one of the nearest massive binary stars to the solar system.

The name Spica (pronounced /ˈspaɪkə/) comes from the Latin phrase spīca virginis, meaning “Virgo’s ear of grain.” The Latin word spicum refers to the ear of wheat Virgo holds in her left hand. In Greek and Roman mythology, the constellation and the star were associated with Demeter (Ceres), the goddess of the harvest.
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Capella

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Capella, also known as Alpha Aurigae or the Goat Star, is the brightest star in Auriga and the sixth brightest star in the sky.

The only stars in the northern celestial hemisphere brighter than Capella are Arcturus in Boötes constellation and Vega in Lyra. The only other star visible from northern latitudes that is brighter than Capella is Sirius in the southern constellation Canis Major.

Capella is sometimes called the Goat Star because its name is derived from the diminutive of the Latin capra, meaning “female goat,” and means “the little goat.”
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Betelgeuse

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betelgeuse

Betelgeuse, Alpha Orionis, is the second brightest star in Orion constellation and the ninth brightest star in the sky. It is a supergiant star, distinctly red in colour, located at an approximate distance of 643 light years from Earth. It is an evolved star, one expected to explode as a supernova in a relatively near future.

Betelgeuse is a large, bright, massive star easily found in the sky in the winter months because it is part of a familiar pattern formed by the celestial Hunter. The red supergiant marks one of Orion‘s shoulders, while the hot, bright giant Bellatrix, Gamma Orionis, marks the other.
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Antares

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alpha scorpii,antares star system

Antares, also known as Alpha Scorpii or Cor Scorpii, is the brightest star in Scorpius and the 15th brightest star in the night sky. Antares is a class M red supergiant marking the heart of the celestial scorpion. It lies at a distance of 550 light years from Earth.

The star is often confused for Mars, the red planet, by observers because it lies within the zodiac, which contains the apparent path of the Sun and planets of the solar system, and the two sometimes appear in the same area of the sky.

Antares was named for its resemblance to Mars, as they both appear reddish in colour. The comparison may have originated with early Mesopotamian astronomers.
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Polaris: The North Star

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polaris,north pole,little dipper,ursa minor

Polaris, also known as the North Star, Alpha Ursae Minoris or Star of Arcady, is the brightest star in Ursa Minor constellation.

Polaris is notable for currently being the closest bright star to the North Celestial Pole. The pole marks true north, which makes the North Star important in navigation, as the star’s elevation above the horizon closely matches the observer’s latitude.

The North Star has a reputation for being bright, but it is not among the top 10 or even the top 40 brightest stars in the night sky. It is only the 48th brightest star, and owes its reputation to the fact that it is the nearest relatively bright (second magnitude) star to the North Celestial Pole.
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Eta Carinae

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eta carinae star

Eta Carinae is one of the most massive binary star systems known, lying at a distance of about 7,500 light years from Earth.

Eta Carinae is located in the direction of Carina constellation. The primary component in the system has about 90 times the mass of the Sun and is 5 million times more luminous.

The smaller star has about 30 solar masses and may be up to a million times more luminous than the Sun. Both stars will reach the end of their life cycle in supernova or hypernova explosions in the relatively near future.
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