Canopus

False Cross

false southern cross

The False Cross is an asterism formed by four bright stars in the constellations Vela and Carina. Located in the far southern sky, the diamond-shaped… Read More »False Cross

Winter Hexagon

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winter circle,winter stars

The Winter Hexagon, also known as the Winter Circle, is a prominent winter asterism formed by seven stars prominent in the winter sky.

These are Rigel in Orion, Aldebaran in Taurus, Capella in Auriga, Castor and Pollux in Gemini, Procyon in Canis Minor, and Sirius in Canis Major constellation.

Sirius and Procyon are also part of the Winter Triangle, a smaller asterism that these two stars form with Betelgeuse in Orion.
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Canopus

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canopus star,alpha carinae,second brightest star

Canopus, Alpha Carinae, is the brightest star in Carina constellation and the second brightest star in the night sky.

Canopus is fainter only than Sirius. The star is a supergiant or bright giant, yellowish-white in colour, with an apparent magnitude of -0.72. It is located at a distance of 310 light years from Earth. It lies too far south and can’t be seen north of latitude 37°18’N, but it is circumpolar for observers south of latitude 37°18’S.

For northern observers, Canopus doesn’t rise very high in the sky. The name Canopus comes from the Greek name Κάνωβος (Kanôbos), first recorded in Ptolemy’s Almagest (150 AD).
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Eta Carinae

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eta carinae star

Eta Carinae is one of the most massive binary star systems known, lying at a distance of about 7,500 light years from Earth.

Eta Carinae is located in the direction of Carina constellation. The primary component in the system has about 90 times the mass of the Sun and is 5 million times more luminous.

The smaller star has about 30 solar masses and may be up to a million times more luminous than the Sun. Both stars will reach the end of their life cycle in supernova or hypernova explosions in the relatively near future.
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Large Magellanic Cloud

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lmc,milky way satellite,magellanic clouds

The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is a dwarf irregular galaxy located on the border between the constellations Dorado and Mensa.

The galaxy is believed to be a satellite of the Milky Way and a member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes about 30 galaxies that are loosely bound together by their gravitation.
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