Leo Minor Constellation


Leo Minor is a small, faint constellation in the northern sky, with only one star brighter than fourth magnitude. The constellation’s name means “the smaller lion” in Latin.

Leo Minor was created by the Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius in 1687. Hevelius created the constellation from 18 stars between the larger constellations Leo and Ursa Major.

The constellation is located between Ursa Major to the north, Cancer to the southwest, Lynx to the west, and Leo, which represents the larger lion, to the south.

Notable deep sky objects in Leo Minor include Hanny’s Voorwerp and the interacting galaxies Arp 107.

FACTS, LOCATION & MAP

leo minor,leo minor constellation,leo minor stars,leo minor location

Leo Minor Constellation Map, by IAU and Sky&Telescope magazine

Leo Minor is the 64th constellation in size, occupying an area of 232 square degrees.

It is located in the second quadrant of the northern hemisphere (NQ2) and can be seen at latitudes between +90° and -40°.

The neighboring constellations are Cancer, Leo, Lynx and Ursa Major.

Leo Minor contains a single star with a known planet and has no Messier objects.

The brightest star in the constellation is Praecipua, 46 Leonis Minoris, with an apparent visual magnitude of 3.83.

The Leo Minorids are the only meteor shower associated with the constellation.

Leo Minor belongs to the Ursa Major family of constellations, along with Boötes, Camelopardalis, Canes Venatici, Coma Berenices, Corona Borealis, Draco, Lynx, Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.


STORY

Leo Minor is a relatively new constellation, and has no myths associated with it. It was first depicted in 1687 in Johannes Hevelius’ Catalogus Stellarum Fixarum.

In 1845, the catalogue was revised by Francis Baily, who assigned Greek letters to stars that were brighter than magnitude 4.5, but he did not give the constellation’s brightest star the designation Alpha in his British Association Catalogue.

In 1870, the English astronomer Richard A. Proctor renamed the constellation to Leaena, or the Lioness, in an attempt to shorten constellation names in order to make them easier to manage on star charts, but the name was not widely adopted.

MAJOR STARS IN LEO MINOR

Praecipua – 46 Leonis Minoris

Praecipua is the brightest star in Leo Minor. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 3.83 and is 94.9 light years distant from the Sun. It has the stellar classification of K0+III-IV, which means that it is an orange star halfway between the subgiant and giant stage of evolution. The star has 1.5 solar masses, is 32 times more luminous than the Sun, and has a diameter 8.5 times solar.

46 Leonis Minoris was presumably intended to get the Alpha designation, but the English astronomer Francis Baily, who had decided to letter all stars brighter than magnitude 4.5, omitted the designation from his catalogue.

The star’s Latin name, Praecipua, means “the chief (star of Leo Minor).”

β Leonis Minoris (Beta Leonis Minoris)

Beta Leonis Minoris is the only star in Leo Minor that has a Greek letter name. It is the second brightest star in the constellation.

Beta Leonis Minoris is a binary star. The components have stellar designations G8III-IV and F8IV, which means that they are a yellow giant-subgiant and a yellow-white subgiant. The brighter star is 36 times more luminous than the Sun and has about twice the mass. It has 7.8 times the Sun’s radius. The companion is 5.8 times more luminous and has 1.35 solar masses. It has twice the solar radius.

The stars have apparent visual magnitudes of 4.40 and 6.12 and are approximately 146 light years distant from the Sun

21 Leonis Minoris

21 Leonis Minoris is the third brightest star in the constellation. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 4.49 and is 92.1 light years distant from the solar system. It has the stellar classification os A7V, which means that it is a white dwarf.

10 Leonis Minoris

10 Leonis Minoris is a yellow giant with the stellar classification of G8III. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 4.60.

37 Leonis Minoris

37 Leonis Minoris is a yellow supergiant belonging to the stellar class G2.5IIa. It has an apparent magnitude of 4.69 and an absolute magnitude of -1.84. The star is approximately 580 light years distant from the solar system.

20 Leonis Minoris

20 Leonis Minoris is another binary star in Leo Minor. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 5.40 and is 49.1 light years distant from Earth.

The system consists of a yellow dwarf belonging to the spectral class G3 Va and an old red dwarf of the spectral type M6.5. The two stars are separated by 14.5 seconds of arc.

11 Leonis Minoris

11 Leonis Minoris is another star system in Leo Minor. The primary star is a yellow dwarf belonging to the spectral class G8V. The star is a bit more massive than the Sun, and slightly dimmer. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 5.41. The primary component is classified as an RS Canum Venaticorum type variable, which means that it is a close binary star with an active chromosphere which can cause large stellar spots, which in turn cause variations in brightness. The star’s luminosity varies by 0.04 magnitudes.

The companion is a red dwarf of the spectral type M5V. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 13.0.

11 Leonis Minoris is 36.5 light years distant from the solar system.

HD 87883

HD 87883 is an orange dwarf star belonging to the spectral class K0V. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 7.56 and is approximately 59 light years distant from the solar system. It is believed to be about 9.8 billion years old.

A planet was discovered orbiting the star on August 13, 2009. HD 87883 b, the exoplanet, is a long-period planet; it takes seven and a half years to complete an orbit around the star.

DEEP SKY OBJECTS IN LEO MINOR

Astronomers found that Hanny's Voorwerp is the only visible part of a 300-light-year-long gaseous streamer stretching around the galaxy. The greenish Voorwerp is visible because a searchlight beam of light from the galaxy's core illuminated it. This beam came from a quasar, a bright, energetic object that is powered by a black hole. An encounter with another galaxy may have fed the black hole and pulled the gaseous streamer from IC 2497. Image: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Astronomers found that Hanny’s Voorwerp is the only visible part of a 300-light-year-long gaseous streamer stretching around the galaxy. The greenish Voorwerp is visible because a searchlight beam of light from the galaxy’s core illuminated it. This beam came from a quasar, a bright, energetic object that is powered by a black hole. An encounter with another galaxy may have fed the black hole and pulled the gaseous streamer from IC 2497. Image: NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)

Hanny’s Voorwerp and IC 2497

Hanny’s Voorwerp is an unidentified astronomical object that was discovered in 2007 by Hanny van Arkel, a Dutch school teacher. She discovered it while taking part in the Galaxy Zoo project as an amateur volunteer. The object’s name, Hanny’s Voorwerp, means Hanny’s object in Dutch.

Hanny’s Voorwerp is located near the spiral galaxy IC 2497 and appears as a bright blob. The object is believed to be the size of the Milky Way galaxy. It has a large central hole, approximately 16,000 light years across. Both the object and the galaxy are about 650 million light years distant from Earth.

Star formation is occurring in the region of Hanny’s Voorwerp which is facing the galaxy. It is thought to be the result of the outflow of gas from the galaxy’s core and the gas interacting with a region of the object. The youngest stars in the region are several million years old.

A theory suggests that Hanny’s Voorwerp is composed of remnants of a small galaxy revealing the impact of radiation from a quasar event that took place in the central region of IC 2497 some 100,000 years ago. The quasar event is believed to have stimulated the bright emission. A theory explaining the absence of a light source is that, because the object and the galaxy are between 45,000 and 70,000 light years apart, the voorwerp is showing a ghost image of the illumination of the quasar, or a light echo of events that occurred before those currently seen in IC 2497.

merging galaxies,leo minor

Interacting galaxy pair Arp 107. Image: Bild tagen av:B. J. Smith (East Tennessee State University)

A more recent theory suggests that the illumination comes from a supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy, and from the light produced by the interaction of the gas surrounding the galaxy and an energetic jet from the black hole.

Arp 107

Arp 107 is a pair of interacting galaxies approximately 450 light years distant from Earth.

The galaxies are in the process of merging.

They have an apparent visual magnitude of 14.6.

NGC 3432. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI, NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF, ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC, NRC, CSA).

NGC 3432. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI, NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF, ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC, NRC, CSA).

NGC 3432

NGC 3432, sometimes known as the Knitting Needle Galaxy, lies 3 degrees southeast of the star 38 Leonis Minoris.

It appears almost edge-on and can be observed in amateur telescopes.

It has an apparent visual magnitude of 11.67 and is about 42 million light years distant from the solar system.

NGC 3003

NGC 3003 is a barred spiral galaxy in Leo Minor.

It is 5.8 arcminutes in size and has an apparent visual magnitude of 12.3.

It appears almost edge-on.

NGC 3344

NGC 3344, image: Ole Nielsen

NGC 3344, image: Ole Nielsen

NGC 3344 is a spiral galaxy seen face-on.

It is approximately 25 million light years distant and 7.1×6.5 arcminutes in size.

It has an apparent visual magnitude of 10.5.

NGC 3504

NGC 3504 is a barred spiral galaxy with an apparent visual magnitude of 11.67.

It is a starburst galaxy, a region of massive star formation.

Two supernovae were observed in the galaxy in recent years, one in 1998 and another in 2001.

NGC 3486. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

NGC 3486. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and obtained from the Hubble Legacy Archive, which is a collaboration between the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI/NASA), the Space Telescope European Coordinating Facility (ST-ECF/ESA) and the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC/NRC/CSA).

NGC 3486

NGC 3486 is a type Sb spiral galaxy, also appearing almost face-on.

It has an apparent visual magnitude of 11.0.

NGC 2859

NGC 2859 is a type SB0 lenticular galaxy in Leo Minor.

It has an apparent visual magnitude of 11.8 and is approximately 85 million light years distant from Earth.

The galaxy has a prominent bar and a bright central region, but the outer disc appears as a detached ring.